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March 11, 2020 2 min read

Your career.

Something that you've probably spent a lot of your childhood, teenage and adult lives thinking about it. It's what you're judged on, who you're identified as and what provides you with the money to live. It's what you do for many hours per day, many days per week, many weeks per year and many years in your life.

A lot of us would have studied through schools, universities, colleges, tafes, online courses, apprenticeships and more to get you to where you are in your career. But what happens when you spend all that time, effort and money into your career, and at the end of it all, you're not sure if it's actually the one that's right for you?

It's a scary proposition to think that you may have somewhat 'chosen the wrong thing'. You may even think that you've wasted time and money in doing so. Despite many people being unhappy in their jobs and careers, many stick around because it's stable, predictable and the status quo. But at what cost?

In episode 8 of The Badminton Podcast, we speak to Erica Pong. She's a former Australian national player who has played on the world circuit in events such as the World Junior Championships, Uber Cup and Sudirman Cup. 

From an academic standpoint, she has excelled, and in this episode, she talks about her decision to transition from physiotherapy to investment banking, how to handle fear and judgement and gives valuable insights as to the mindset involved in making big decisions.

Have listen here (or on your favourite podcast platform):

Let us know what you think and be sure to tune into our other episodes on your favourite podcast platform: Spotify, Stitcher, Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Breaker, Anchor, Overcast, Pocket Casts, RadioPublic, Player FM. Just search for "The Badminton Podcast".

Or you can visit:www.anchor.fm/thebadmintonpodcast and get direct links for your preferred platform.

We'd love to hear your opinions, comments, tips and tricks so please feel free to comment below. If you would like us to write about something in particular, please let us know!
Main image source: Lawyers Weekly

Jeffrey Tho
Jeffrey Tho

Jeff is an ex-international badminton player who represented Australia at the Commonwealth Games (twice as a player & once as a coach), World Championships, All England Championships and multiple Thomas and Sudirman Cups. He was the Australian National Coach, Senior State Head Coach and is the co-founder of Volant badminton & The Badminton Podcast. Jeff is extremely passionate about building the worldwide badminton community & showing the world how incredible our sport really is.


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